Boosting Your Baby's Nutrition May Help Avoid Asthma & Allergies

Babies in the US are now 5x more at risk for developing allergies and asthma

By Deb Nicolson, Patch Mayor

Boosting Your Baby's Nutrition May Help Avoid Asthma & Allergies

More children are now suffering from asthma and allergies than before. According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA), more than 6 million children under the age of 18 have asthma and more than 50 million Americans have environmental and/or food allergies. What's even more surprising is that asthma and allergies are often impacted by the development of an infant's gut during infancy.

New research shows that American babies' gut microbiome has changed remarkably from our grandparents' generation. This is due in part to modern medical practices such as antibiotics and C-sections, which interrupt the transfer of beneficial bacteria from mom to baby. Additionally, American babies now have gut microbiomes that are completely different from babies in other countries where that transfer still occurs, and where rates of metabolic and immune diseases remains lower. The key change is that American babies are now missing B. infantis – the good bacteria which protect baby's gut from potentially harmful bacteria. Without this beneficial bacteria, potentially harmful bacteria can dominate baby's gut. Many studies link these potentially harmful bacteria to higher risk of allergies and asthma.

"In addition to breastfeeding and providing your baby with good nutrition I recommend that all moms give an infant a probiotic called Evivo," said Dr. Tanya Altmann is a leading pediatrician and best-selling author.

Evivo is the first and only probiotic clinically proven to restore a baby's gut microbiome to its original, natural state. Given once daily Evivo helps develop a healthy immune system and metabolism to set up babies for healthier lives.

Only Evivo (activated B. infantis) is clinically proven to increase beneficial bacteria, help reduce potentially harmful bacteria, and restore a baby's gut microbiome to its original, natural state.

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