Health Watch: Enhancing nutrition may help avoid asthma and allergies

By David Morales

Enhancing nutrition may help avoid asthma and allergies

New research suggests that babies’ in America are more at risk for developing allergies and asthma because their gut microbiome has changed remarkably from our grandparents’ generation. Because of modernized western practices in medicine such as antibiotics and C-sections, babies are now missing B. infantis – the good bacteria which protect baby’s gut from potentially harmful bacteria.  

Many studies link these potentially harmful bacteria to higher risk of allergies and asthma. According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA), more than 6 million children under the age of 18 have asthma and more than 50 million Americans have environmental and/or food allergies. The Hype magazine wanted to know more.

Leading pediatrician and best-selling author Dr. Tanya Altmann expertise lies in baby nutrition and gut health, but she took the time to discuss with The Hype magazine everyday parenting issues. She also shared tips on how to make sure your baby is getting B. infantis

Why are we seeing an increase of allergies and asthma among children today?

Many factors come into play when we talk about why we are seeing such a dramatic increase in allergies and asthma in kids. Recent research points to disruption of the infant gut microbiome as playing a significant role. Historically babies received some good gut bacteria called B infantis during the birthing process and we have good data now to show that in nine out of 10 babies, this transfer no longer occurs due to things like antibiotics and C-sections. So, when babies aren’t born with this good Bifidobacterium infantis to help protect their gut, you can see an overgrowth in bad gut bacteria. It’s this overgrowth in bad unhealthy gut bacteria that is linked to asthma and allergies later on in life.

How can we make sure our babies have this beneficial gut bacteria? Read more on TheHypeMagazine.com