The Infant Gut Microbiome

And its fascinating influence on Baby's Immune System.

The development of the infant immune system is a complex process. Exposure to beneficial bacteria, particularly B. infantis, is critical in infant immune system development. When B. infantis is introduced and colonized in the infant gut microbiome, it may protect the infant from developing proallergic responses: B. infantis does not antagonize dendritic cells, or antigen-presenting cells, and therefore helps develop an appropriate immune response.1

gut microbiome

How Evivo Works in the Gut Microbiome

Evivo (activated B. infantis EVC001, ActiBif®) is a specific strain of B. infantis that is activated, meaning it is able to better utilize human breast milk components to grow and dominate the infant gut microbiome in a unique and superior manner. During our patented fermentation process, Evivo is grown on a substrate that activates the genes that allow it to consume the HMOs in breast milk better than any other gut bacteria. This gives Evivo an extra advantage in the baby’s gut.

B. infantis and the Immune System

Once B. infantis is established in an infant’s gut microbiome, it works to restore and protect the infant in a variety of ways. By outcompeting potential pathogens for growth, it can:

  • Decrease harmful bacteria’s chance at proliferating3 
  • Improve the gut barrier function by reinforcing tight junctions, thereby reducing intestinal permeability4
  • Downregulating gut inflammation4

The activated B. infantis strain in Evivo works together with the special carbohydrates, or HMOs, in breast milk to restore the infant gut microbiome to its original, natural state. The unique and superior manner by which Evivo consumes HMOs allows it to protect the gut microbiome.

Feeding Evivo once daily with breast milk can help create a foundation for lifelong health—from the inside out.

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References
1. Tannock GW. Commentary: remembrance of microbes past. Int J Epidemiol. 2005;34:13-15.
2. Bubnov RV, Spivak MY, Lazarenko LM et al. Probiotics and immunity: provisional role for personalized diets and disease prevention. EPMA J. 2015;6(1):14.
3. Fukuda S, Toh H, Hase K et al. Bifidobacteria can protect from enteropathogenic infection through production of acetate. Nature. 2011; 469(7331):543-547.
4. Ewaschuk JB, Diaz H, Meddings L et al. Secreted bioactive factors from Bifidobacterium infantis enhance epithelial cell barrier function. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2008;295(5): G1025-G1034.